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Table 5 Effects of immigrants on natives labor market transitions, 2SLS

From: Do immigrants squeeze natives out of bad schedules? Evidence from Italy

  (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
Transitions NE‐E NE‐NS E‐E NS‐E S‐E NS‐NS S‐NS
log (Foreign Population) 0.005 ‐0.002 0.004 0.006 0.003 ‐0.041*** ‐0.012***
  (0.00440) (0.00187) (0.00412) (0.00531) (0.00421) (0.0124) (0.00410)
Observations 196,221 196,221 246,119 68,347 177,393 63,465 162,815
Mean of the Dep.Var. 0.09 0.026 0.92 0.93 0.92 0.68 0.11
Standard errors in parentheses
*** p<0.01, ** p<0.05, * p<0.1
  1. Notes: NE = non‐employed; E = employed; NS = employed on non‐standard schedule; S = employed on a standard schedule. Columns headings describe states as t 0 t 1 . Samples, NE‐E and NE‐NS: non employed at t 0 ; E‐E: employed at t 0 ; NS‐E: employed on non‐standard schedule at t 0 ; S‐E: employed on standard schedule at t 0 ; NS‐NS: employed at t 0 and t 1 , on non‐standard schedule at t 0 ; S‐NS: employed at t 0 and t 1 , on standard schedule at t 0 . All the estimates presented include standard socio‐demographic controls (age dummies, gender, education dummies, family size, family type, number of people in household under 9 years old, between 10 and 18 and older than 65, relevant economic features of the province as of 1995 (the sectoral composition of value added and sectoral labor productivity) and province size and region‐year fixed effects as in column 4 of Table 1. Sector dummies are included only when the sample is restricted to the employed population. The data sources are LFS (2006‐2008), Municipal Records (2006‐2008), ISTAT Province Accounts (1995) and Minister of Interior for Residence Permits issued at the province level as of 1995.