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Table 8 Effect of logged immigration on the probability of a minimum wage increase

From: Minimum wages, earnings, and migration

   Less-educated     Labor force  
  (1) (2) (3) (4)   (5) (6) (7) (8)
 ln(immigrants t−1) .005 -.023 -.231** -.138   .003 -.025 -.158* -.110
  (.020) (.023) (.115) (.128)   (.020) (.023) (.082) (.086)
 Economic controls t−1     
 State & year FE       
 State trends         
 R2 .001 .014 .565 .722   .000 .081 .562 .722
 Obs. 306 306 306 306   306 306 306 306
  1. Note–Binary dependent variable is whether or not a state changed its minimum wage. Standard errors are reported in parenthesis below the coefficients. *indicates significance at the 10% level, **at 5% and ***at the 1% level. Standard errors are clustered by state. The lesseducated immigrant sample consists of all person ages 16-65 who have a high school degree or less, are foreign born, and non-citizens. The labor force sample is equivalent to the final sample from the mobility analysis. Specifically, they are the less-educated sample with additional restrictions to ensure that immigrants are in the labor force, not self-employed, not in unpaid work, and not working in the agricultural sector. Creating leads in immigration causes a reduction in the number of observations.