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Table 14 Race-specific estimates of σ r

From: Immigration and wages: new evidence from the African American Great Migration

    1940–1960 1940–1970
Wage sample Labor supply sample   OLS IV (Immig. component) IV (National stock) OLS IV (Immig. component) IV (National stock)
All All log(L) −0.25 −0.17 −0.26 −0.23 −0.17 −0.22
    (0.06) (0.05) (0.05) (0.04) (0.03) (0.04)
   Black*log(L) 0.17 0.07 0.25 0.15 0.09 0.18
    (0.08) (0.06) (0.08) (0.05) (0.04) (0.05)
   N 234 234 234 311 311 311
Native All log(L) −0.26 −0.18 −0.26 −0.23 −0.18 −0.22
    (0.06) (0.05) (0.05) (0.04) (0.03) (0.04)
   Black*log(L) 0.19 0.06 0.27 0.12 0.06 0.14
    (0.09) (0.08) (0.12) (0.06) (0.05) (0.06)
   N 234 234 234 312 311 312
  1. Notes: The estimating equation is \(\log w_{exrt}=\lambda _{exr}+\lambda _{ert}+\lambda _{ext}-{\sigma _{w}^{1}}\log L_{exrt}-(\sigma _{b}^{-1}-\sigma _{w}^{-1})1_{r=b}\log L_{exrt}+u_{exrt}\). Immig. component refers to the immigrant component of labor supply and National stock refers to the labor supply among all Southern-born workers (including those living in the North). Standard errors for the estimates of σ i , σ r , and σ x are clustered by education-experience group (or race-education-experience groups for models that pool both races). All regressions are weighted by the number of observations used to construct the dependent variable