Skip to main content

Table 16 The effects of South-North migration on wages

From: Immigration and wages: new evidence from the African American Great Migration

   1940–1960 1940–1970
   1940 shares 1950 shares 1940 shares 1950 shares
   OLS IV OLS IV OLS IV OLS IV
White Overall 0.00 0.00 0.01 0.01 0.00 0.00 0.01 0.01
Black Overall −0.14 −0.13 −0.22 −0.20 −0.09 −0.11 −0.19 −0.24
White Less than 5th grade 0.00 0.00 0.02 0.02 0.03 0.03 0.05 0.05
  5th–8th grade 0.02 0.02 0.03 0.03 0.03 0.03 0.05 0.05
  Some high school 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.01 0.01 0.01
  High school degree 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 −0.01 −0.01 −0.01 −0.01
  Greater than high school −0.01 −0.01 0.01 0.01 −0.03 −0.03 −0.01 −0.01
Black Less than 5th grade 0.03 0.03 0.04 0.04 0.09 0.10 0.12 0.13
  5th–8th grade −0.03 −0.03 −0.02 −0.02 0.05 0.05 0.06 0.06
  Some high school −0.33 −0.30 −0.40 −0.36 −0.22 −0.27 −0.30 −0.37
  High school degree −0.43 −0.39 −0.53 −0.49 −0.46 −0.57 −0.67 −0.82
  Greater than high school −0.31 −0.28 −0.28 −0.25 −0.39 −0.48 −0.36 −0.44
  1. Notes: Columns labeled “OLS” use the OLS estimate of the elasticity of substitution between blacks and whites; columns labeled “IV” use estimates of this elasticity obtained by instrumenting for relative labor supplies with relative supplies among the national stock of Southerners. All other elasticities are taken from IV estimates based on the labor supplied within skill groups by immigrants. “1940 shares” means that immigration and wage effects are weighted by 1940 wage bill shares, and similarly for “1950 shares”