Skip to main content

Table 7 OLS estimates of weekly wage earnings—2006

From: Is the lower return to immigrants’ foreign schooling a postarrival problem in Canada?

  (1) Native-born (2) Immigrants—CE (3) Immigrants–FE
Coef. P > |z| Coef. P > |z| Coef. P > |z|
Degrees
 Trades Base Base Base
 Registered apprenticeship 0.0437 0.000 0.0109 0.480 −0.0511 0.022
 College—less than 1 year −0.0053 0.551 −0.024 0.179 −0.1999 0.543
 College—1 to 2 years 0.0357 0.000 0.0166 0.280 −0.0265 0.174
 College—more than 2 years 0.0787 0.000 0.0549 0.001 −0.0156 0.399
 University—below bachelor’s 0.1039 0.000 0.0628 0.004 0.0283 0.191
 Bachelor’s 0.1819 0.000 0.1471 0.000 0.0433 0.052
 Above bachelor’s less than Master’s 0.2234 0.000 0.1861 0.000 0.0802 0.002
 Medicine, dentistry, veterinary, optometry 0.1080 0.071 0.1833 0.007 0.0698 0.244
 Master’s 0.3061 0.000 0.2347 0.000 0.0640 0.032
 PhD 0.4808 0.000 0.4356 0.000 0.2547 0.001
Observations 1,228,448 219,417 150,183
  1. Notes: (1) The dependent variable is log weekly wage. (2) Standard errors are adjusted at occupation and field of study cells by using the two-way clustering method (Cameron et al. 2011). (3) All equations also control for age, age square, marital status, disability, visible minority status, primary earner status, spoken language (only English, only French, bilingual, others), regional fixed effects for 10 provinces, location of study fixed effects at 10 categories, field of study fixed effects at 1375 categories, and occupation fixed effects at 520 categories. (4) The equations also include industry fixed effects at 21 categories. However, results do not change significantly when industry fixed effects are excluded. (5) “CE” and “FE” denote Canadian-educated and foreign-educated. (5) Immigrants’ age is decomposed to years since migration and before migration. (6) Information on years in education is not available in the 2006 Census. Therefore, we have to use age as a proxy to control work experience