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Table 2 The Impact of Immigration on Wages, Static Model

From: The impact of EU and Non-EU immigration on British wages

  Dependent Variable, Ln Wirt-1
  (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6)
  Not weighted Weighted Weighted, robust S.E.s Not weighted Weighted Weighted, robust S.E.s
  OLS IV
Panel a: Full Sample
(Immigrant/native ratio)irt-1 -0.023***
(0.008)
-0.034***
(0.007)
-0.034
(0.040)
-0.047*
(0.029)
-0.082***
(0.021)
-0.082
(0.091)
Unemployment rate irt-1 0.067*
(0.036)
0.090*
(0.038)
0.090*
(0.050)
0.05
(0.037)
0.042
(0.040)
0.42
(0.090)
Sample Size 6,468 6,468 6,468 6,454 6,454 6,454
Adjusted R2 0.993 0.996 0.996 0.993 0.996 0.996
  1. Notes:
  2. a Equations in column (1), (2) and (3) are estimated using ordinary least squares (OLS), with columns (4), (5) and (6) being estimated using instrumental variables, where the lagged immigrant native ratio is instrumented using a counterfactual that is based on the historic settlement enclave of immigrants.
  3. b Standard errors are reported in parenthesis; those in columns (3) and (5) are heteroskedasticity-robust, clustered over the 275 regions-occupation groups.
  4. c In specifications 2, 3, 5 and 6 we weight each cell by its employment.
  5. Each equation also contains age controls (mean immigrant age, mean native age), skill controls (share of native population with degree, with completed school, still in education) and a full set of region/year, occupation/year and region/occupation interaction dummies.
  6. d t = time (25 years, 1992–2016), i = occupation (25 2-digit occupations), r = region (11 Government Office Regions). This implies a maximum of 6875 (25X25X11) observations. The table shows fewer observations because some cells have have missing information.
  7. e ***=significance at 1% level; **=significance at 5% level; *=significance at 10% level.
  8. Sources: LFS and ASHE/NES.